Ecological Archives E096-115-A1

Steve J. Kroiss and Janneke HilleRisLambers. 2015. Recruitment limitation of long-lived conifers: implications for climate change responses. Ecology 96:12861297. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-0595.1

Appendix A. Supplementary study site information.

FigA1

Fig. A1. Panel A displays a map of the 18 forest stands in which we studied recruitment limitation in Mount Rainier National Park, USA. Numbers in this plot represent the elevation of each stand in meters. The shaded area indicates areas with glaciers and the dashed line indicates roads within the park. Panel B illustrates the layout within stands. Seed production was censused using six seed traps (0.176 m² laundry baskets) spaced 5 m apart. Seedlings were censused in 1 m² plots adjacent to each seed trap. All trees above 15 cm DBH within the stand were measured for DBH.


 

Table A1. Environmental characteristics for each of the 18 forest stands. Climatic data were obtained from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) climate-mapping model (Daly et al. 2008).

Stand

Elevation (m)

Latitude

Longitude

Side

Mean annual temperature (°C)

Cumulative precipitation (cm)

TO11

564

46.9945

-121.8870

NW

7.59

149.77

TA01

630

46.7413

-121.5581

E

7.98

153.67

TO04

643

46.7404

-121.8884

SW

7.56

152.32

TB13

792

46.7404

-121.8480

SW

7.38

156.58

AV02

835

46.8238

-121.5505

E

6.61

136.86

AO03

855

46.8268

-121.5482

E

6.46

136.27

AG05

913

46.7474

-121.8044

SW

6.8

174.4

AV06

1035

46.7763

-121.7842

SW

5.96

201.42

AB08

1042

46.9201

-121.5372

E

5.85

124.87

AX15

1062

46.7503

-121.8246

SW

6.28

160.45

AV14

1081

46.9599

-121.8476

NW

5.64

205.38

PP17

1128

46.8949

-121.6033

E

5.11

156.87

AM16

1170

46.7686

-121.7575

SW

5.19

223.67

AE10

1431

46.7682

-121.7433

SW

4.77

235.44

AR07

1435

46.7763

-121.7479

SW

4.63

235.66

PARA

1608

46.7765

-121.7323

SW

3.98

240.22

SPRY

1700

46.9191

-121.8360

NW

3.1

276.62

SUNR

1800

46.9286

-121.6551

E

2.27

170.49

 

Table A2. Basal area measurements (m²/hectare) for each of the study species in the 18 stands.

Stand

Abies amabilis

Callitropsis
nootkatensis

Pseudotsuga
menziesii

Thuja plicata

Tsuga heterophylla

Tsuga mertensiana

TO11

0

0

79.84

0

41.34

0

TA01

0.5

0

93.45

0

11.57

0

TO04

2.63

0

0

29.06

26.33

0

TB13

0

0

63.02

18.62

29.44

0

AV02

21.93

0

0

2.01

38.54

0

AO03

29.69

0

59.07

73.91

34.01

0

AG05

29.37

0

11.74

27.76

8.3

0

AV06

27.01

0

0

0

11.63

0

AB08

0

0

0

8.04

50.8

0

AX15

0

0

30.29

6.73

33.84

0

AV14

41.5

0

0

0

50.01

0

PP17

0

0

15.72

0

1.03

0

AM16

9.79

22.55

0

0

9.47

21.53

AE10

42.93

46.11

0

0

0

0

AR07

18.2

15.34

0

0

0

51.34

PARA

21.46

2.82

0

0

0

39.87

SPRY

34.9

5.52

0

0

0

25.56

SUNR

33.37

26.35

0.15

0

0

16.18

 

FigA2

Fig. A2. The elevational position of each of the 18 forest stands along with range classifications for each species. Species' ranges were divided into thirds (lower, core, or upper) based on the recorded minimum and maximum elevational position for each species based on previous forest surveys on Mount Rainier (Franklin et al. 1988). The ranges for three of the species (Thuja plicata, Pseudotsuga menziesii, and Tsuga heterophylla), extend below the lowest elevations in the park and their ranges were thus divided in half: core and upper.


Literature cited

Daly, C., M. Halbleib, J. Smith, W. Gibson, M. Doggett, G. Taylor, J. Curtis, and P. Pasteris. 2008. Physiographically sensitive mapping of climatological temperature and precipitation across the conterminous United States. International Journal of Climatology 28:2031–2064.

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