Ecological Archives E092-026-A4

Stefan A. Schnitzer, John N. Klironomos, Janneke HilleRisLambers, Linda L. Kinkel, Peter B. Reich, Kun Xiao, Matthias C. Rillig, Benjamin A. Sikes, Ragan M. Callaway, Scott A. Mangan, Egbert H. van Nes, and Marten Scheffer. 2011. Soil microbes drive the classic plant diversity–productivity pattern. Ecology 92:296–303.

Appendix D. A table showing the performance of each plant species in each of the species richness treatments.

TABLE D1. Values represent the percent difference in shoot biomass between a manipulated soil treatment (either “sterile soil” [+0] or “sterile soil + AMF” [+AMF] or “sterile soil + saprobes/pathogens” [+SP]) and the untreated field soil treatment. Note that the largest increases in biomass are in the lowest diversity treatment in sterile [+0] and sterile + AMF [+AMF] treatments, where biomass was one order of magnitude higher than the untreated field soil treatment.

Plant Species* Soil Treatment Plant Species Richness Treatment
    1 5 10 15
Achillea millefolium          
  +0   -22 -11  
  +AMF   33 41  
  +SP   -20 12  
Agrostis gigantea          
  +0     16 8
  +AMF     49 2
  +SP     -10 0
Asclepias syriaca          
  +0   52 -16 2
  +AMF   62 39 18
  +SP   13 -18 6
Aster cordifolius          
  +0       -3
  +AMF       -7
  +SP       -2
Aster lanceolatus          
  +0   39 21 14
  +AMF   31 55 6
  +SP   21 -12 -3
           
Aster macrophyllus          
  +0       8
  +AMF       9
  +SP       5
Aster novae-angliae          
  +0 414 90 22 -5
  +AMF 283 64 15 14
  +SP 16 10 7 -5
Bromus inermis          
  +0   35 -31 11
  +AMF   10 38 13
  +SP   -6 -5 2
Cerastium vulgatum          
  +0     -14 16
  +AMF     44 10
  +SP     -2 -3
Chrysanthemum leucanthemum        
  +0   -20   -5
  +AMF   4   19
  +SP   -16   -2
Cichorium intybus          
  +0     -2 -14
  +AMF     51 15
  +SP     6 -3
Cirsium arvense          
  +0     -9 -2
  +AMF     37 4
  +SP     -17 1
Dactylis glomerata          
  +0   16 28 26
  +AMF   49 67 15
  +SP   24 6 3
Daucus carota          
  +0   37 -17 22
  +AMF   69 25 15
  +SP   -15 -19 4
Echium vulgare          
  +0   16 10 15
  +AMF   32 13 26
  +SP   3 27 10
Erigeron annuus          
  +0 237     -6
  +AMF 359     16
  +SP -29     -4
Euthamia graminifolia          
  +0   49 14 -17
  +AMF   80 35 2
  +SP   19 -6 -7
Festuca pratensis          
  +0        
  +AMF     10 10
  +SP     -18 -5
Fragaria virginiana          
  +0       -3
  +AMF       14
  +SP       -6
Geum macrophyllum          
  +0   -3 -3 -14
  +AMF   41 21 31
  +SP   -29 -16 -8
Hypericum perforatum          
  +0 169   28 -20
  +AMF 288   39 21
  +SP -26   -20 3
Linaria vulgaris          
  +0 539   -4 1
  +AMF 405   17 7
  +SP 21   -3 -6
Medicago lupulina          
  +0     -17 -7
  +AMF     21 3
  +SP     -6 4
Oenothera biennis          
  +0     2 -10
  +AMF     26 15
  +SP     13 -2
Phleum pratense          
  +0 304 41   21
  +AMF 289 72   18
  +SP -37 -15   7
Plantago lanceolata          
  +0   18   12
  +AMF   31   14
  +SP   -41   -6
Plantago major          
  +0     -14 7
  +AMF     22 7
  +SP     -5 8
Poa compressa          
  +0       13
  +AMF       -2
  +SP       -13
           
Potentilla recta          
  +0   37 -5 -3
  +AMF   -6 -1 18
  +SP   31 -26 5
Prunella vulgaris          
  +0   -14 -24 -3
  +AMF   29 10 0
  +SP   -48 -3 -7
Ranunculus acris          
  +0     16 12
  +AMF     31 15
  +SP     -7 -1
Rudbeckia hirta          
  +0   -18 -3 -16
  +AMF   44 14 9
  +SP   -19 -18 -8
Solidago altissima          
  +0     -11 -2
  +AMF     21 -8
  +SP     -2 -12
Solidago canadensis          
  +0     -11 11
  +AMF     10 8
  +SP     9 2
Trifolium pratense          
  +0   24 -4 -6
  +AMF   60 13 14
  +SP   8 -6 3

* All species are herbaceous biennials or perennials, except Erigeron annus, which is an annual.


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