Ecological Archives A019-010-A1

Gregory P. Asner, Roberta E. Martin, Andrew J. Ford, Daniel J. Metcalfe, and Michael J. Liddell. 2009. Leaf chemical and spectral diversity in Australian tropical forests. Ecological Applications 19:236–253.

Appendix A. Eight figures, providing complementary data rearranged by species or measurement technique, referenced in the main text as key additional illustrations pertinent to the interpretation of the role that species play in determining the chemical and spectral diversity of Australian tropical forests.

Whereas all of the primary data for the paper are presented in the main manuscript, these additional figures provide complementary data rearranged by species or measurement technique. Click here for a PDF file of the appendix.

FigA1
 

   FIG. A1. Mean (+ 1 SE) leaf nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations, and N:P ratio, for canopy species in nine common families found through our rain forest sites. White bars indicate families that were found at all 11 study sites. Letters denote statistical differences among groups using ANOVA with Tukey multiple comparison tests (P < 0.05).


 

FigA2
 

   FIG. A2. Mean (+ 1 SE) specific leaf area (SLA) and water, total chlorophyll (Chl a+b), carotenoid and anthocynanin concentrations for canopy species in nine common families found through our rainforest sites. White bars indicate families that were found at all 11 study sites. Letters denote statistical differences among groups using ANOVA with Tukey multiple comparison tests (P < 0.05).


 

FigA3
 

   FIG. A3. Standardized chemical signatures for canopy species in nine common families found through our rain forest sites. Data are organized by family, then by genus and species. Color bars quantitatively show relative differences among leaf properties. The black line and dots show a chemical index UCgamma, as described in the main text.


 

FigA4
 

   FIG. A4. Mean (+ 1 SE), minimum and maximum values of leaf hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of canopy species in nine common families found through our rain forest sites.


 

FigA5
 

   FIG. A5. PLS scatterplots showing absolute prediction strength of the hyperspectral transmittance data for multiple leaf chemicals and specific leaf area (SLA). The r-squared values provide a relative measure of the important of each leaf constituent in determining the spectral reflectance of all species.


 

FigA6
 

   FIG. A6. PLS scatterplots showing absolute prediction strength of the hyperspectral absorptance data for multiple leaf chemicals and specific leaf area (SLA). The r-squared values provide a relative measure of the important of each leaf constituent in determining the spectral reflectance of all species.


 

FigA7
 

   FIG. A7. PLS weighting factors for each leaf chemical property and specific leaf area (SLA). Panel (a) shows the results using leaf transmittance; panel (b) shows results based on leaf absorptance (= 1-reflectance-transmittance). Wavelengths of maximum importance in determining leaf properties are those with spectral weightings that diverge from the zero value line.



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