Ecological Archives A017-093-A2

Irene Tetreault and Richard F. Ambrose. 2007. Temperate marine reserves enhance targeted but not untargeted fishes in multiple no-take MPAs. Ecological Applications 17:2251–2267.

Appendix B (Table B1). Equations and data used for fecundity calculations.

Species

Fecundity equation

n

r2

P value

Mean spawning interval (d)

Mean spawning period (d)

Halichoeres semicinctus, rock wrasse

Fm = 45[1]

53 [1]

   

2.9 [1]

144 [1]

Hypsypops rubicundus, garibaldi

Fm = 35 (13.2) [2]

9 [2]

   

6 [2]

144 [2]

Paralabrax clathratus, kelp bass

Fs = 0.00000269 SL2.93 (0.430) [6]

25 [6]

0.491 [6]

<0.001 [6]

2.4 (n = 84, not size related) [6]

112 (n = 80) [2]

Paralabrax nebulifer, sand bass

Fs = 0.000000166 SL3.17 (0.342) [6]

4 [6]

0.714 [6]

0.155 [6]

1.6 (n = 81, not size related) [6]

144 (n = 74) [4]

Semicossyphus pulcher, CA sheephead

Fm = 15 (8.7) [2]

26 [2]

   

1.3 (n=26) [2]

112 [2]

 

Species

Mean no. of spawnings/yr

Mean length @ 50% population mature

Mean female:male ratio in population

Halichoeres semicinctus, rock wrasse

50 [3]

22.6 cm TL [3]

0.65 (n = 301) [3]

Hypsypops rubicundus, garibaldi

24 [4]

20.3cmTL, sex unspecified [4]

0.58 (n = 83) [1]

Paralabrax clathratus, kelp bass

47 [5]

22.6 cm TL (n = 84) [5]

0.45 (n = 70) [1]

Paralabrax nebulifer, sand bass

90 [5]

23.9 TL female (n = 85 13-35 cm TL) [5]

0.67 (n = 13, range 22-36 cm TL) [1]

Semicossyphus pulcher, CA sheephead

86 [7]

29.8 cm TL female[7]

Gender identifiable in the field [7]

Notes: Fs = size-specific fecundity (mean number of eggs per batch), SL in mm, parenthetical value is SD of the mean; Fm = mass-specific fecundity (mean number of eggs per batch per g female somatic mass). n is the number of fish sampled in the study, r2 and the P values are statistical outcomes from the linear regression in the study. SL = standard length, TL = total length. 1Barnett et al. 1991 unable to measure directly; we back-calculated using Barnett’s measured values for confamilial species S. pulcher [(0.60 g eggs per g somatic mass per season) ÷ (2.681e-4 g per egg * 50 batches per year)].

LITERATURE CITED

[1]Barnett, A. M., T. D. Johnson, E. E. DeMartini, L L. Craft, M. White, R. F. Ambrose. 1991. Production and valuation study of an artificial reef off southern California. Report prepared for the Port of Long Beach, Port of Los Angeles, and the National Marine Fisheries Services, by MEC Analytical Systems (Weston Solutions), 2433 Impala Drive, Carlbad, California 92008 USA.

[2]DeMartini, E.E., A. M. Barnett, T. D. Johnson, and R. F. Ambrose. 1994. Growth and production estimates for biomass-dominant fishes on a southern California artificial reef. Bulletin of Marine Science 55(2-3):484–500.

[3] Diener, D. R. 1976. Hermaphroditism in Fish: A comparative study of the reproductive biology and endocrinology of the California Labridae. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of California, San Diego, California, USA.

[4]Limbaugh, C. 1955. Fish life in the kelp beds and the effects of kelp harvesting. Institute of Marine Resources, University of California La Jolla, IMR Reference 55-9, 158 p.

[5]Love, M.S., A. Brooks, D. Busatto, J. S. Stephens Jr, and P.A. Gregory. 1996. Aspects of the life histories of the kelp bass, Paralabrax clathratus, and barred sand bass, Paralabrax nebulifer, from the southern California Bight. Fishery Bulletin 94(3):472–481.

[6]Oda, D. L., R. J. Lavenberg, and J. M. Rounds. 1993. Reproductive biology of three California species of Paralabrax (Pisces: Serranidae). California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations Reports 34:122–132.

[7]Warner, R. R. 1975. The reproductive biology of the protogynous hermaphrodite Pimelmetopon pulchrum Pisces: Labridae). Fishery Bulletin 73(2):262–283.


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