Ecological Archives A019-045-A1

Elizabeth T. Borer, Vincent T. Adams, Gareth A. Engler, Autumn L. Adams, Canan B. Schumann, and Eric W. Seabloom. 2009. Aphid fecundity and grassland invasion: Invader life history is the key. Ecological Applications 19:1187–1196.

Appendix A. Full statistical model results for aphid and lab experiments (I–IV).

The following tables present the full statistical models for experiments IIV. For model details, see the Methods section. For most models, we performed orthogonal contrasts to examine the independent effects of life history (annual vs. perennial) and host provenance (native perennial vs. exotic perennial). (Significance codes for all tables: P < 0.001 '***'; 0.001 < P < 0.01 '**'; 0.01 < P < 0.05 '*'; 0.05 < P < 0.1 '.')

TABLE A1. R. padi field fecundity estimates (experiment I). The statistical model shown here examines fecundity (# babies produced per experimental unit) as a function of host life history, provenance, and phylogenetic group.

tableA1


 

TABLE A2. R. padi greenhouse fecundity estimates (experiment II). The statistical model shown here examines fecundity (# babies produced per experimental unit) as a function of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization, host life history, provenance, and phylogenetic group.

tableA2


 

TABLE A3. Model of host mass from the greenhouse fecundity experiment (II). The statistical model shown here examines plant aboveground biomass as a function of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization, host life history, provenance, and phylogenetic group.

tableA3


 

TABLE A4. Host tissue chemistry models from the greenhouse fecundity experiment (II). The statistical model shown here examines tissue chemistry in aboveground biomass as a function of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization, host life history, provenance, and phylogenetic group.

tableA4a

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TABLE A5. R. padi preference estimates (experiment III). This statistical model examines preference of R. padi aphids for hosts of differing life history, provenance, and phylogeny (estimated using aphid density on each plant after 24 hours, or # aphids/ aboveground host mass)

tableA5


 

TABLE A6. R. maidis, R. padi, and S. avenae greenhouse fecundity estimates (experiment IV). This model examines fecundity (# babies produced per experimental unit) as a function of aphid species, nitrogen fertilization, host life history, provenance, and phylogenetic group. Because of overdispersion in the data, we fit a quasi-Poisson model.

tableA6


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